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Archive for the ‘Urban Farming’ Category

HOMEGROWN Life: Building a Cheap Greenhouse

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

HOMEGROWN-LIFE-LT-GREENI can’t believe I haven’t written about our greenhouse. We’ve been using it for at least a year and a half now, and I’ve been oddly silent about it. I guess it’s probably because it’s not 100 percent complete. We have one small area that still needs a permanent covering, the windows need new glazing, and it is in desperate need of new paint. But it’s still functional and gets a lot of use. And it only cost us about $300.

greenhouse1

That might sound like a lot of money until you consider that this greenhouse is 8 by 12 feet and uses glass glazing. Buying a glass greenhouse that size will generally run you around $5,000.

Why a glass greenhouse? Why not just make a hoop house to save money? Hoop houses are great, don’t get me wrong, but they just don’t stand the test of time. While they are cheaper to make upfront, there are some concerns you have to take into consideration. The material usually used for hoop houses is plastic sheeting, which doesn’t last more than a few years, even if it is UV-resistant greenhouse plastic film. I’d prefer not to have to add more plastic to the landfill or spend the money replacing it. Also, you have to give special consideration to the hoop structure. PVC pipe will degrade the plastic through chemical reaction faster than it normally would degrade (and most isn’t UV resistant), so you either have to wrap the pipe or use another material, like galvanized pipe, which increases the cost. Plus, we have a very windy site for most of the year, and plastic sheeting just wouldn’t hold up.

Polycarbonate greenhouses also degrade from UV but last substantially longer than poly film. Polycarbonate is a plastic, and even though it may hold up for 10 to 20 years when properly treated with UV stabilizers, it will discolor and become more opaque after time. It also becomes brittle. Double-walled polycarbonate adds the benefit of being more insulating than both glass and film. It can be quite pricey, though. Not as expensive as buying glass specifically for a greenhouse, but if you can do glass, which is superior to both film and polycarbonate, for less than either, why wouldn’t you?

windows

It’s all about the windows. It is amazing how many people are trying to offload free windows. Craigslist is where we scored the majority of ours. We also scored a free door, which was half-window, from my best friend, who had just bought a house and wanted to replace her front door. We stockpiled old windows until we had what we felt was enough to begin building. Before starting, we laid out the panes on the ground so we could get the right configuration to fit the walls of the greenhouse. Do this carefully. We had a few casualties but fortunately had enough windows to make up the difference. We also made sure that we had some windows with frames so we could open them as needed when it got hot in the summer.

leveling

Next, we had to figure out where to site the greenhouse. We had a space on the north edge of our property that wasn’t shaded, and it wouldn’t shade out anything. We made the long 12-foot wall south facing to maximize sun exposure. We also decided that, since the north wall is facing a fence, we could just use plywood for it. We framed up the structure with new lumber, which is where a good portion of the money we spent went. The most costly part of this job, however, was the roofing material. We used some of the extra pavers we had on hand to level the structure, since our ground slopes. It was also imperative that we add extra bracing, as the weight of the windows can be quite substantial.

windows going in

The biggest score from our window search were these two 6-foot-long windows that someone had purchased and never bothered using. They easily spanned the whole lower half of our south-facing wall. It was a tight fit, but we got them in. From our next-door neighbor, we also got narrower windows that flank the door (seen in the first photo).

Greenhouse

Once we got most of the windows in on the south-facing wall, we started framing the door and getting the roof joists up. Sexy, ain’t it? We decided to do a simple sloped roof rather than a gable so that the south side would get even more sun exposure, especially in the winter, when the sun angle is lower and when we need the greenhouse the most. One note: A door that comes with a jamb will make framing much easier.

greenhouse2

Once the door was in, we were able to finish up adding windows and roofing. For that, we used clear corrugated plastic sheeting. It’s not a particularly pretty greenhouse and it does need a coat of paint, but it’s definitely functional.

greenhouse

Of course, you also have to think about the interior. Where are you going to put plants? And what about the floor? We scored some pea gravel off of Freecycle, enough to put down a nice 3-inch layer. We put down weed cloth first, though, so we won’t be fighting the never-ending onslaught of bindweed and Bermuda grass inside. Tom build a fantastic 8-foot-long potting bench out of scrap wood, and we bought some heavy duty utility baker’s racks for the plants. We’ll probably switch the locations of these, putting the potting bench on the east-facing wall and the racks on the south-facing wall, so we can add another rack. We’re also using an old compost bin (our chickens do all of our composting now) as soil storage.

Have you built your own cheap greenhouse out of scavenged materials? Do you have photos or tips to share? Post them below!

Rachel-Dog-Island-FarmRachel’s friends in college used to call her a Renaissance woman. She was always doing something crafty, creative, or utilitarian. She still is. Instead of arts and crafts, her focus these days has been farming as much of her urban quarter-acre as humanly possible. Along with her husband, she runs Dog Island Farm, in the San Francisco Bay Area. They raise chickens, goats, rabbits, dogs, cats, and a kid. They’re always keeping busy. If Rachel isn’t out in the yard, she’s in the kitchen making something from scratch. Homemade always tastes better!

ALL PHOTOS: RACHEL

HOMEGROWN Life: Homemade Stock (Virtually Free!)

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

 

HOMEGROWN-LIFE-LT-GREENGood food is expensive. If you grow it and/or raise it yourself, you know how much hard work it takes to put food on your table. A little part of me dies inside when I toss out bits and pieces of unusable food, even if it is going into the compost or out to the chickens. But I’ve learned that I no longer have to waste anything. I can make stock from all the leftovers. I love homemade stock, but again, I’m not a fan of using perfectly good food—and a lot of it—to make a big batch of stock. My homemade stock is the perfect meeting of the two: no waste of food leftovers and no need to use the good parts.

stock

The parts that you wouldn’t eat anyways get used to make more food, meaning stock is virtually free to make. Onion and garlic skins and trimmings, the outer leaves and cores of cabbage, carrot ends and leafy ends of celery, winter squash skin, corn cobs, pepper tops and cores, and the woody stems from herbs like rosemary and thyme are just some of the vegetative parts you can add. We also like to throw in carcasses and bones from roasted chickens, turkeys, and rabbits. Old stewing hens can go in whole; pull the meat off after cooking and use it for later meals. You can just do vegetables if you want, or you can add other types of meat and bone, such as beef or pork. You can even mix the types of animals you use, if you want.

Scraps

There are some things, however, you don’t want to add to your stock. Avoid really starchy foods like potatoes and sweet potatoes. Don’t use toxic or fatty vegetable parts either, like avocado skins and pits or tomato tops (tomato skins and cores are OK).

As you cook various meals, collect all the trimmings and put them in a bag and freeze them. This allows you to collect a large amount of scraps to make a big batch of stock. You can also do smaller amounts and make just enough stock for a pot of soup, but since time is at a premium for some us, it works better to do big batches and then pressure can the stock for later use. You can also freeze the stock if you have plenty of freezer space, which unfortunately is also at a premium for us. One-gallon freezer bags work great for this. You can use some types of Mason jars to freeze the stock, as well, but it takes longer to defrost those. With gallon freezer bags, all you need to do is heat the outside enough so that it slips out of the bag into a large pot. The other benefit of freezing the stock rather than pressure canning is that you can skip the step of refrigerating it so you can skim the fat off. Just cool it down first before putting it into containers. (You don’t want to melt the bag or stress the glass more than necessary.)

water

Once you have enough scraps, put them in a large stock pot and add just enough water so that the scraps are nearly covered. We use a big 7-gallon stock pot, so we wait until we have a LOT of scraps. You can choose to add salt now, later, or not at all. I like to wait until it’s almost done so I can taste it. The amount of salt will depend on your personal preference and how much stock you make at once. It isn’t necessary, though, if you are concerned about your salt intake.

A good stock is going to take several hours to make. Turn the heat on high and get it up to a boil. Then reduce the heat and let it simmer on the stove for several hours, usually about eight hours. Occasionally add more water as needed. You will know it’s done when the carcasses completely fall apart and the stock has a good flavor. Taste it occasionally. When you like the flavor, it’s done. Allow it to cool and then, with some large tongs, start pulling out the larger pieces of scraps to discard. If there’s meat you can pick, you can start pulling it off and putting it in another bowl. Once all of the large scraps are out, line a colander with cheese cloth and strain the remaining broth to get out the small bits and pieces you couldn’t remove with the tongs.

Once strained it, you can freeze or pressure can it. If you pressure can, put the stock in the fridge for at least 24 hours. You want the fats in it to solidify so you can skim them off. You can skip this step if you are only doing vegetable stock.

Since I’ve started making my own stock, I’ve found that I no longer have to buy it because the scraps we produce are enough to make stock regularly. Bonus is that it’s healthier because there isn’t any MSG (or MSG by another name), and you can control the sodium.

MORE FROM HOMEGROWN:

Rachel-Dog-Island-FarmRachel’s friends in college used to call her a Renaissance woman. She was always doing something crafty, creative, or utilitarian. She still is. Instead of arts and crafts, her focus these days has been farming as much of her urban quarter-acre as humanly possible. Along with her husband, she runs Dog Island Farm, in the San Francisco Bay Area. They raise chickens, goats, rabbits, dogs, cats, and a kid. They’re always keeping busy. If Rachel isn’t out in the yard, she’s in the kitchen making something from scratch. Homemade always tastes better!

 

HOMEGROWN Life: Surviving Drought in Your Garden—in California or Anywhere

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

 

HOMEGROWN-LIFE-LT-GREENThe biggest question garden-loving Californians are asking right now is, “Should I even grow a garden this year with this drought?” It’s a responsible, well-meaning question. I asked it myself a few weeks ago. I went back and forth about it. A garden increases your water use, but at the same time, you don’t want to let all of your hard work die.

And then it dawned on me, as I was driving by agricultural fields being irrigated by overhead spray in the middle of the day: I’m going to be eating food that requires water use anyway.

If I grow it, I can control how much water is used. In fact, I can actually reduce my water use through food consumption if I grow it myself. The LA Times recently had an article about how much water is required to grow certain foods. If you eat meat, goat needs the least amount of water per pound of meat. An apple requires 18 gallons, and an orange requires 13 gallons. That’s quite a bit of water for just one fruit. Potatoes require 119 gallons of water per pound. Yikes.

My guilt of growing a garden subsided a bit. Now it was time to figure out what I can do to reduce my water footprint even more. I hope these tips help you as well.

KNOW YOUR SOIL

 

soilstructure

One of the keys to water-wise drought gardening, and gardening in any conditions, is to know what kind of soil you have. If you have raised beds, you most likely have a soil that is high in organic matter and maybe even has a bit of topsoil. If your beds aren’t brand new, you’re going to want to get your soil tested so you know what nutrients you need to add. Plants that are getting enough nutrients are going to be hardier and will weather the drought better. If you plant in the ground like I do, you are also going to want to know the soil’s structure. How much sand, silt, and clay does your soil have? Sandy soil doesn’t hold water very well, while clay soil has a tendency to hold onto water too well.

In addition, you can check out the Web Soil Survey through the USDA (push the green button). This will give you an idea of how deep your soil is, which directly affects how much water it can hold. It will also tell you the water-holding capacity of your soil. For the record, our soil is 20 to 40 inches deep but only holds 4.5 inches of water, which means that if it rained 6 inches, the soil would only be able to hold 4.5 inches, and the remaining 1.5 would run off, or flooding would occur. Also, the water table is more than 80 inches deep, so I can depend on trees being able to access it, as most tree roots only go down 2 to 3 feet.

AMEND YOUR SOIL

 

compost (2)

Adding compost to dig in

Starting from the ground up, we first want to make sure our soil is well amended with a lot of organic matter. Organic matter will help absorb and hold onto more water. It will also help provide enough nutrients for the plant to develop strong root systems. Organic matter helps fast-draining sandy soils hold onto water and helps heavy clay soils distribute the water deeper to the root zone, making it more available to the plant. If you have tested your soil through A&L Agricultural Laboratories, as I recommend, they will offer suggestions of what to add to your soil to grow your desired crops. You can read more about developing your own organic blend in the Composting 101.

CONTROL YOUR WATER

 

tomato

A tomato planted at the drip-tubing emitter location

Fortunately for us, we are already on the right track. Our entire property is on drip/micro irrigation. If you don’t have your vegetable beds on drip, now is the time to invest. A drip system does several things.

  • It reduces the amount of water you use while watering by 50 percent or more.
  • It reduces diseases caused by overhead watering.
  • It reduces problems with weeds.
  • It reduces the amount of time you spend watering.
  • It reduces runoff and erosion.

If you don’t have a drip irrigation system yet and don’t know how to put one in, I’ve got a pretty thorough Drip Irrigation 101 that can help you. Once you have your driplines in, situate your plants near emitters so that the plants fully utilize as much water as possible. Instead of watering a little bit every day, water heavily but less often. You want the roots to travel as far down as you can get them to go. Plants with shallow roots are more likely to get dried out and stressed. Most plants require an inch of water per week. My aim is to water with drip 30 minutes twice a week. Of course the length and frequency of watering depends on the drip components you use. Many manufacturers offer calculators to determine how long and how often you should run your irrigation. To reduce evaporation, schedule your irrigation to turn on between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. Early morning hours are preferable.

RETAIN YOUR WATER

 

Give all your plants a thick layer of mulch

Give all your plants a thick layer of mulch.

If you do go the drip irrigation route, mulch the hell out of everything you plan to water. And I mean MULCH. Lots of it. Go for at least 4 inches, if the plant’s height allows. Straw is a cheap mulch that you can use, although it does get slick when wet and has a tendency to blow around. Bark mulch is heavier and longer lasting but can be expensive, unless you get it from a tree service. Getting it from a tree service, however, can limit you to mulch from whatever tree they just removed, and some tree species, such as black walnut and eucalyptus, can cause problems in the garden.

So far, one of the best mulches I have found for water retention is old livestock bedding. It’s heavier because it has absorbed urine and feces (which also increases its fertility), so it doesn’t blow away. It’s also finer in texture from being broken up by hooves, so it doesn’t have as many air spaces to allow evaporation. If you don’t have livestock, you can get old bedding from horse stables, which often give it away for free. Just be careful about weed seeds. Horses that are stabled tend to have fewer weed seeds in their feces than pastured horses. I’ve used rice hull bedding from a local stable before, and this stuff was fantastic. You can also save up dried leaves and use those as well. We tried out plastic-mulch sheeting one year and found that it helped hold onto more water than expected. It also helped heat up the soil for plants that preferred warm ground temps. Melons and watermelons really thrived with the black plastic. The more drought-tolerant plants, such as tomatoes, didn’t fare quite as well.

Whatever you use, make sure to lay the mulch over your irrigation lines. You don’t want to water the mulch because it will absorb all of the water and not allow any to reach the soil and your plants. You also don’t want to have mulch right up against the stems of most plants (the onion family and potatoes plants tend to be the exceptions), as it can cause problems with rot. An inch or so away is fine, though.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT PLANTS

 

All of this Pink Banana Squash came from just a single volunteer plant that we only watered twice

All of this pink banana squash came from a single volunteer plant that we only watered twice.

Not all vegetables are created equal. Some, like celery, onions, green beans, carrots, lettuces, and melons require a lot more water than other vegetables. Squash, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, chard, arugula, and dry beans, especially Tepary beans, are better choices for drought gardening, when water is restricted. Most plants have critical periods, when they require more water than normal. This is usually during flowering and fruit production.

If you really want to grow some of the higher-water-need plants, put them together on a separate water valve. That way you can have part of your garden getting more water than the rest, rather than the entire garden getting more water than some plants need. Also, space the plants farther apart, so they aren’t competing with each other for every precious drop. You may end up with fewer plants, but you won’t have to water as much.

The picture above of all the squash is a perfect example of how water-wise gardening can be productive. All of that squash—each weighing approximately 20 pounds—came from a single volunteer plant. It sprouted in our old chicken yard, so the soil had lots of organic matter and a high nutrient content. Because it was a volunteer, we didn’t have irrigation going to it and only ended up giving it two deep waterings early on in its growth. That year was wetter then this one, so the soil had a larger water capacity than this year, but it goes to show that, if done correctly and mindfully, very little applied water can result in a big harvest.

We have a lot of volunteer vegetable plants that grow in our yard. Most of the time they are in our beds, but sometimes they grow in spots that don’t get any supplementary water. These vegetables are the ones that do best in drought conditions because they don’t need the extra water. Chard, squash, arugula, and tomatoes are the most common drought-tolerant volunteers growing in our yard. Artichokes are very drought tolerant as well. Their growing season is in the winter and spring, and then they die back in the summer and go dormant until the rains return. We rely nearly 100 percent on the rainy season for our artichoke plants. We’ve never watered them until this year. They and the trees are now getting the water we save.

A WORD ON CONTAINER GARDENING

 

If you have a small yard or balcony and still want to grow some of your food, you can go the container gardening route, even in a drought. You’ll follow many of the same guidelines as outlined above, but you also want to take care regarding the type of container you are using. Terracotta planters are going to dry out a lot faster than plastic or even glazed pottery. You’ll want to set saucers under your pots to catch excess water. An even better system would be to invest in or make self-watering containers. These only release water as the plant needs them and are low-water use. For instructions on how to set up your own system, check out the Self-Watering Container (aka Subirrigated Planter) 101.

SAVE YOUR WATER

 

We now have several 5 gallon buckets in our kitchen and bathroom to collect water that can be used for watering perennial plants and trees. One of those buckets is in the bathtub, specifically to catch the cold water before it gets warm. This is perfectly fresh, clean water that shouldn’t be wasted. In addition, we are now saving some of our kitchen water. If you cook pasta, don’t salt it. You can use that water in the garden. If we’re rinsing off produce, we save that water. We also save some dish-washing water, based on what we are cleaning and what soap we’re using. If it has touched raw meat, raw eggs, etc., it goes down the drain. (You can also save laundry water if you aren’t washing diapers.) All of this water is getting used on our artichoke plants, fruit trees, and various shrubs. I don’t use it on annual vegetables whose leaves or roots we eat.

Besides saving water, we’re also reducing the amount we use. The saying, “If it’s yellow, let it mellow; if it’s brown, flush it down,” is heard quite often around our house now. We also turn off the water when we’re brushing our teeth, which we all should do anyway, and turn it on only to rinse the dishes. Also, while washing dishes, we run the water a lot lower. The tap seems to rinse them just as quickly at a lower flow than at full blast, so I hope to see a savings there. We’ve also shortened our showers to just 5 minutes. I’m planning on getting a valve to attach to the shower head so we can turn it off while we’re soaping up.

By reducing the amount of water your garden and your household use, and by saving some of that water, you can reduce your overall usage enough to not have to feel guilty. If you’re growing your own and following water-wise guidelines, you are helping reduce more water than just what you see on your bill. Whether or not your area is experiencing drought conditions, following these methods will conserve water, which is always a good thing.

HOMEGROWN Life blog: Rachel, of Dog Island FarmRachel’s friends in college used to call her a Renaissance woman. She was always doing something crafty, creative, or utilitarian. She still is. Instead of arts and crafts, her focus these days has been farming as much of her urban quarter-acre as humanly possible. Along with her husband, she runs Dog Island Farm, in the San Francisco Bay Area. They raise chickens, goats, rabbits, dogs, cats, and a kid. They’re always keeping busy. If Rachel isn’t out in the yard, she’s in the kitchen making something from scratch. Homemade always tastes better!

ALL PHOTOS: RACHEL